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Mar. 21st, 2007 @ 02:02 am Revelations and original text/language question
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I have a question that's been bothering me for little while now, and hoping someone here can help me with it.

"The Number of The Beast" as mentioned in "The Apocalypse/Revelation of John" (ΑΠΟΚΑΛΥΨΙΣ ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ) and later texts "The Apocalypse/Revelation of the theologian" (ΑΠΟΚΑΛΥΨΙΣ ΤΟΥ ΘΕΟΛΟΓΟΥ) primarily use the Greek " χξς " to indicate the number 666. There is no point in getting into the 616/665/666 debate here. My question is, if I understand correctly, the Greeks, like the Hebrews, used their lettering for their numerical system as well, thus giving numerical values to words and vice versa. Not being very well versed, or at all, in Greek, much less ancient Greek, I am curious as to what that would translate into, at least phonetically. If nothing else, does anyone know the names of the characters used?

Thank you.
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exeyel:
From:mathiasroesel
Date:March 21st, 2007 01:12 pm (UTC)
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666 in Greek characters is Χ'Ξ'F' (digamma is used as 6). As a Greek word, it cannot be pronounced, lacking vowels. The pronunciation of the number in ancient Greek is hexakósioi hexékonta hex.

In Hebrew characters, 666 can be either סום or תסור, the latter possibly סותר, also. Dots above characters would signify that they are used as numerals, implying that they are not to be pronounced as Hebrew words. 666 in Hebrew is shesh me'á shishîm wa-shesh.
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From:exeyel
Date:March 21st, 2007 03:07 pm (UTC)
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thanks!

I get odd curiosities from time to time. Was not aware of the dots in Hebrew for numbering.
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From:lhynard
Date:March 21st, 2007 03:52 pm (UTC)
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Everything mathiasroesel said was correct.

The letters in the Greek would have the following sounds: "ch" as in Scottish "loch" or German "ich" -- a sound we do not have in English; "x" as in "axe"; and "w" as in "wow".

Interestingly enough, if you write "Nero Ceasar" in ancient Hebrew, you get נרון קסר, Neron Kaiser ("Nero" in Green was Neron). The letters of נרון קסר add up to 666 exactly. Also, if you use נרו קסר, Nero Kaiser instead, this is 616, which is found, as you hinted, in other manuscripts.
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From:lhynard
Date:March 21st, 2007 03:53 pm (UTC)

oops!

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Green = Greek
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From:exeyel
Date:March 21st, 2007 03:58 pm (UTC)
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yes, I've read many places that this was supposed to be indicative of Nero and thus was more relevant at the time, and may have been the reason. Political message disguised in allegory/prophecy.
Thanks for the clarification on the phonetics.
From:mathiasroesel
Date:March 21st, 2007 11:06 pm (UTC)
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Everything lhynard explained here still is correct. >:)
From:nlwrykyy
Date:September 15th, 2008 08:53 pm (UTC)
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I know this is an old post and might not even get a reply, but I have seen this spelling (קסר) elsewhere and have to ask, why is qaf used instead of kaf? /q/ doesn't exist in any IE language and while it's the lazy norm for people to realize qaf aas kaf, the fact is qaf was a distinct sound in biblical hebrew just as it is in every other semitic language, such as Arabic. I know for gematria reasons it's nice to spell words in the way that gives a proper gematria value, but the romans could not pronounce caesar as /qaiser/, they lack that phoneme.
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From:lhynard
Date:September 16th, 2008 03:26 pm (UTC)
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couldn't tell you; sorry

You might consider posting an entry with the question.
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From:exeyel
Date:September 17th, 2008 12:54 am (UTC)
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If you do end up posting an entry on that let me know, have been a strange on lj lately.